Martin Hochmeister claims that his Semantic Web Company, generate semantic use cases that enhance knowledge productivity through semantic web technologies that connect and situate data in a meaningful contextual structure that resembles the mind-brain network for organizing info and experience.

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Webliography and Bibliography

Hochmeister, Martin. 2008. “Semantic Web: a ‘humanizer’ for computer-aided work.” >> Semantic Web Company. May 20.

Random notes for the bricoleur:

The process behind the blog

An email from my Twitter account told me I was being followed by digitalassetman @ twitter

When this happens unless the tweeter’s avatar suggests an obviously 100% market-motivation, I skim read a bit to get a sense of the author/tweeter’s style, form, content and context. Hochmeister’s article provides succinct language relating to a use of the semantic web that does not interpret knowledge management as uniquely a commodity management. While Hochmeister’s main interest is as a business offering products and services, his skillful use of language his writing may prove to be a quotable resource. I will follow more through twitter and on his blog from time to time.

I am looking for the most precise, efficient terms for what is being done in the name of the semantic web in 2008.

I have been exploring interconnectivity between a myriad of open source Semantic Web services and products. The methodical slow process of linking is not unlike a digital sudoka where urls are lined up instead of numbers.

How did Hochmeister code his blog’s .jpg so that digg.com automatically-generated the appropriate 100 pixel image as an image option for diggers to associate with his post?

Tag Cloud

(folksonomy, tagging) : semantic web, semantic web company, computer-aided work, semantically enabled, semantically enabled services, semantically enabled products, services and products, humanize, dehumanize, are you a machine?, are you human?, knowledge as commodity, digital sudoka,

Snurl Roll

(snurl cloud) http://snurl.com/29yiv http://snurl.com/29y8w http://snurl.com/29yaa

Semantic Web Services and Products:

igoogle.com, delicious.com, digg.com, wordpress.com

twitter.com

snurl.com & tinyurl.com

Trackbacks:

http://www.semantic-web.at/1.36.resource.238.semantic-web-a-x27-humanizer-x27-for-computer-aided-work.htm http://snurl.com/29yiv for

http://www.semantic-web.at/1.36.resource.238.semantic-web-a-x27-humanizer-x27-for-computer-aided-work.htm

http://digitalassetmanagementorguk.wordpress.com


http://tinyurl.com/66tdjf

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Zeldman suggested a plug-in to time-associate lifestreams (egostreams), microblogs, blogs, aggregators, social bookmarking, social media, etc. My use of a myriad of semantic web services has become a virtual mnemonic tool, a digital cartography of memory . . .

Visitd bloggersblog through my twittr stream http://snurl.com/25t6q [twitter_com] and read this post http://snurl.com/25t5r [www_bloggersblog_com] which referrd 2 this comment on http://snurl.com/25t5z [www_zeldman_com] about potential of a plug-in to time-associate lifestreams, microblogs, blogs: Flickr, Ma.gnolia, del.icio.us, Twitter

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“The Bank of England will announce Monday a scheme which will see it lend money to banks in return for collateral in a bid to help the troubled U.K. mortgage market, U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling said Sunday Wall Street Journal . Following Business and Financial News in 2008 has been an exciting, mind-boggling, incredulous (mis)adventure. It has become difficult to choose those stories that will remain relevant in the future as part of the social and economic history of this chaotic period. See also http://snurl.com/25asj and http://snurl.com/25aus

read more | digg story
“Nice deal… nationalize risk, privatizes profit.”

digg users comments are themselves very revealing. I don’t think active digg users represent a broad spectrum but I am not sure? Are the demographics on digg similar to other services offering trendy tech tools? young male techies writing for young male techies?

Along with evangelical Ron Paul supporters, there is a very active core group writing anarchist, anti-government, minimal government, avoid-banks-buy-gold, avoid-banks-cash-only diggs with some nasty digg between digg users.

RSS is a big deal, as anyone who’s subscribed to even a few feeds probably knows. Once you get past just a few feeds, though, it can quickly get overwhelming. RSS can leave you feeling inadequate, brain-dead and uninspired.

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NYT article on the at-risk lifestyles of high-speed, high-stress, high-adrenalin lifestyles of pro-bloggers chasing new improved on-line newstories 24/7.

Thanks to twitter and Steve Rubel’s lifestream for bringing this article to my attention.

“digg.com blurb: “Some professional bloggers complain of physical and emotional strain created by an Internet economy that demands a constant stream of news and comment.”

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This reminded me of an article by Kate Argyle (1996) in Rob Shields useful anthology entitled Cultures of the Internet. Argyle’s account of what happens when a member of a virtual community dies challenged notions of that Internet communities were blasé and that the Internet itself fostered  a culture of distance and indifference. See http://www.socresonline.org.uk/1/3/van_loon.html

Webliography and bibliography

Argyle, Kate. 1996. “Death on the Internet.” in Shields, Rob. 1996. Cultures of the Internet: Virtual Spaces, Real Histories, Living Bodies. Chapter 8. London: Sage. ISBN 0 8039 7519 8

This freeze-screen image WordPress, Flickr and Digg is from my Flickr album.
Wordpress and digg: Self-submitting and the auto-generation of headlines, descriptions and categories. Bricoleur/bricoleuse refers to a do-it-yourself model of using social media as a way to share resources by producing a bricolage of content, codes and connectivity with tools, methods and technologies usually created for another purpose.

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digg.png

Chester (2007) illustrates how the Google-sold media ad Green Tea Partay on Google-owned YouTube (viewed 3M times) featuring a pseudo-hiphop-for-the-conspicuous-consumer cleverly conceals an ad for Smirkoff Vodka.

A single tab (window) in Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 presented as a single ‘page’ on a computer screen resembles the classic print-version newspaper more than the classic web page from the 1990s. With Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 blogs (and even your very personal Gmail) and ad-enhanced content there is a cacophony of voices, a postmodern irony to the conflicting messages in advertisements, news, opinions, reviews, classified ads displayed within one frame. We became used to the classical (but now largely outdated) unique web pages in one frame, window or tag that presented information from an author from a specific standpoint with virtually no peripheral advertising. As powerful search engines like Google using complex algorithms to connect information seekers to information providers combine with a brilliant ad-service, the boundaries between page-frame-window author and paid-publicity have become so blurred that the argument in the content of the page can conflict with the products and services sold on the page. In one blog, for example, articles, reports, studies, entertainment, infotainment, advertisements, news, opinions, reviews and classified ads all appear to have resonance, when in reality their messages diverge completely. The confusion is even greater when the content-author is not clearly identified.

We can no longer say that “the media is the message” because the rhizomic media network of Web 2.0 sends mixed, often conflicting messages.

Unfortunately, in the one area where conflicting ads are absent — academic journals — the exclusive, proprietorial nature of most of these require registration or pay-per-use. They are not easily accessible and are relegated to the realm of the deep Web or Internet (once called the Invisible Web).

The solution will probably not come from more policing of Google-like service providers. In an ideal world readers might be compelled to become increasingly sophisticated in distinguishing sources and might engage in more robust critical thinking. In a dystopic highly materialistic world-view we are only one click away from buying more of what we don’t need.

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Related entries on Speechless

Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 2007. “Synset, Semantic Web, CBC and Alberta Oil.” September 28.

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