Martin Hochmeister claims that his Semantic Web Company, generate semantic use cases that enhance knowledge productivity through semantic web technologies that connect and situate data in a meaningful contextual structure that resembles the mind-brain network for organizing info and experience.

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Webliography and Bibliography

Hochmeister, Martin. 2008. “Semantic Web: a ‘humanizer’ for computer-aided work.” >> Semantic Web Company. May 20.

Random notes for the bricoleur:

The process behind the blog

An email from my Twitter account told me I was being followed by digitalassetman @ twitter

When this happens unless the tweeter’s avatar suggests an obviously 100% market-motivation, I skim read a bit to get a sense of the author/tweeter’s style, form, content and context. Hochmeister’s article provides succinct language relating to a use of the semantic web that does not interpret knowledge management as uniquely a commodity management. While Hochmeister’s main interest is as a business offering products and services, his skillful use of language his writing may prove to be a quotable resource. I will follow more through twitter and on his blog from time to time.

I am looking for the most precise, efficient terms for what is being done in the name of the semantic web in 2008.

I have been exploring interconnectivity between a myriad of open source Semantic Web services and products. The methodical slow process of linking is not unlike a digital sudoka where urls are lined up instead of numbers.

How did Hochmeister code his blog’s .jpg so that digg.com automatically-generated the appropriate 100 pixel image as an image option for diggers to associate with his post?

Tag Cloud

(folksonomy, tagging) : semantic web, semantic web company, computer-aided work, semantically enabled, semantically enabled services, semantically enabled products, services and products, humanize, dehumanize, are you a machine?, are you human?, knowledge as commodity, digital sudoka,

Snurl Roll

(snurl cloud) http://snurl.com/29yiv http://snurl.com/29y8w http://snurl.com/29yaa

Semantic Web Services and Products:

igoogle.com, delicious.com, digg.com, wordpress.com

twitter.com

snurl.com & tinyurl.com

Trackbacks:

http://www.semantic-web.at/1.36.resource.238.semantic-web-a-x27-humanizer-x27-for-computer-aided-work.htm http://snurl.com/29yiv for

http://www.semantic-web.at/1.36.resource.238.semantic-web-a-x27-humanizer-x27-for-computer-aided-work.htm

http://digitalassetmanagementorguk.wordpress.com


http://tinyurl.com/66tdjf

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Zeldman suggested a plug-in to time-associate lifestreams (egostreams), microblogs, blogs, aggregators, social bookmarking, social media, etc. My use of a myriad of semantic web services has become a virtual mnemonic tool, a digital cartography of memory . . .

Visitd bloggersblog through my twittr stream http://snurl.com/25t6q [twitter_com] and read this post http://snurl.com/25t5r [www_bloggersblog_com] which referrd 2 this comment on http://snurl.com/25t5z [www_zeldman_com] about potential of a plug-in to time-associate lifestreams, microblogs, blogs: Flickr, Ma.gnolia, del.icio.us, Twitter

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NYT article on the at-risk lifestyles of high-speed, high-stress, high-adrenalin lifestyles of pro-bloggers chasing new improved on-line newstories 24/7.

Thanks to twitter and Steve Rubel’s lifestream for bringing this article to my attention.

“digg.com blurb: “Some professional bloggers complain of physical and emotional strain created by an Internet economy that demands a constant stream of news and comment.”

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This reminded me of an article by Kate Argyle (1996) in Rob Shields useful anthology entitled Cultures of the Internet. Argyle’s account of what happens when a member of a virtual community dies challenged notions of that Internet communities were blasé and that the Internet itself fostered  a culture of distance and indifference. See http://www.socresonline.org.uk/1/3/van_loon.html

Webliography and bibliography

Argyle, Kate. 1996. “Death on the Internet.” in Shields, Rob. 1996. Cultures of the Internet: Virtual Spaces, Real Histories, Living Bodies. Chapter 8. London: Sage. ISBN 0 8039 7519 8

This freeze-screen image WordPress, Flickr and Digg is from my Flickr album.
Wordpress and digg: Self-submitting and the auto-generation of headlines, descriptions and categories. Bricoleur/bricoleuse refers to a do-it-yourself model of using social media as a way to share resources by producing a bricolage of content, codes and connectivity with tools, methods and technologies usually created for another purpose.

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digg.png


Merrill Lynch Bull Reflecting on Enron

Originally uploaded by ocean.flynn.

Tse, Tomoeh Murakami. 2008. “Economic Downturn Emboldens Shareholder Activists.” Washington Post. February 19, 2008.

tag cloud: corporate governance, senior executive compensation guidelines, New York, investor groups, plunging stock prices, executives, corporate board members, accountability, annual shareholder meetings shareholder, U.S. companies, credit crunch, activist investors, financial services companies, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch, Washington Mutual, shareholder proposals, major banks, transparency, discloser, risk management, mortgage-related risks, Wall Street investment firms, executive succession plans, credit-rating agencies, conflicts of interest, rate securities, security rating, CtW Investment, major financial institutions, subprime mortgage-related losses, shareholder value, economy, recession, investors, withhold votes, network of shareholder groups, multimillion-dollar payouts, financial executives, worst corporate performance, executive compensation, residential homebuilding crisis, credit crisis, corporate affairs, Laborers’ International Union of North America, shareholders, public, housing market decline, losses in securities related to subprime mortgages, five-year housing boom, that peaked in mid-2005, mortgage lenders, risky credit, Wall Street investment banks, complex securities, ultra-safe, AAA ratings, credit-rating agencies, defaulting mortgage payments, risk-averse, management experts, Enron scandal, shareholders challenged corporate boards, larger, more widespread losses, toxic subprime mortgages, investment portfolios, Wall Street banks, large institutional money managers, pension plans, small towns overseas, advocating changes in corporate governance, directors elected by majority of stockholders, shift to majority voting, Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at University of Delaware, shareholder resolutions, union pension funds, measure of shareholder unrest, high investor support, opportunity for hedge funds, shareholders with larger stakes, mount a takeover campaign for board seats, dissatisfied investors, opportunistism, challenge management, effect change, shareholders, improved disclosure, mortgage-related risks, Ryland Group, home builder, mortgage-lending unit, types of home loans, secondary market, fair disclosure rules, Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Washington Mutual, Beazer Homes, Securities and Exchange Commission, credit agencies, safe mortgage-backed securities, billions of dollars, mortgage-backed securities, safe investments, credit agencies, shareholder scrutiny, Moody’s, parent company, Standard & Poor’s, direct involvement, management potential conflicts of interest, enhancing independence, rotate lead analysts, hire outside firm, conduct regular reviews, rating process, customer feedback, Merrill Lynch, Citigroup, write down securities, $46 billion, mortgage-related securities, restate value on company books, targets of shareholder proposals, AFL-CIO, limit executive employment agreements, exclude evergreen clauses, automatic renewal of employment agreements, shareholder approval, bans on accelerated vesting of stock options, ban on excise tax gross-ups, ban on paying executives’ taxes, response to CEO’s multimillion-dollar pay packages, senior executive compensation guidelines, current practices, expanded disclosure of succession plans, CtW Investment, directors responsible for risk oversight, risk oversight, protect shareholders, mortgage-related losses, epicenter of the meltdown, huge losses, destabilized market, value strategies, pension funds, corporate governance, protect shareholders’ interests, directors independent of management, audit committee,

Chester (2007) illustrates how the Google-sold media ad Green Tea Partay on Google-owned YouTube (viewed 3M times) featuring a pseudo-hiphop-for-the-conspicuous-consumer cleverly conceals an ad for Smirkoff Vodka.

A single tab (window) in Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 presented as a single ‘page’ on a computer screen resembles the classic print-version newspaper more than the classic web page from the 1990s. With Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 blogs (and even your very personal Gmail) and ad-enhanced content there is a cacophony of voices, a postmodern irony to the conflicting messages in advertisements, news, opinions, reviews, classified ads displayed within one frame. We became used to the classical (but now largely outdated) unique web pages in one frame, window or tag that presented information from an author from a specific standpoint with virtually no peripheral advertising. As powerful search engines like Google using complex algorithms to connect information seekers to information providers combine with a brilliant ad-service, the boundaries between page-frame-window author and paid-publicity have become so blurred that the argument in the content of the page can conflict with the products and services sold on the page. In one blog, for example, articles, reports, studies, entertainment, infotainment, advertisements, news, opinions, reviews and classified ads all appear to have resonance, when in reality their messages diverge completely. The confusion is even greater when the content-author is not clearly identified.

We can no longer say that “the media is the message” because the rhizomic media network of Web 2.0 sends mixed, often conflicting messages.

Unfortunately, in the one area where conflicting ads are absent — academic journals — the exclusive, proprietorial nature of most of these require registration or pay-per-use. They are not easily accessible and are relegated to the realm of the deep Web or Internet (once called the Invisible Web).

The solution will probably not come from more policing of Google-like service providers. In an ideal world readers might be compelled to become increasingly sophisticated in distinguishing sources and might engage in more robust critical thinking. In a dystopic highly materialistic world-view we are only one click away from buying more of what we don’t need.

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Related entries on Speechless

Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 2007. “Synset, Semantic Web, CBC and Alberta Oil.” September 28.

Filed in Blogosphere, Google Docs & Spreadsheets, Learning from users, New generation social marketing, SEO, Web 2.0, collaborative, energy, ethnoclassification, ethnoclassification: faceted tagging, findability, folksonomy, folksonomy:faceted tagging, search engine optimization, semantic web, social bookmarking, tagging

Academically speaking, semantic search ought to be a system which understands both the user’s query and the Web text using cognitive algorithms similar to that of the human brain, then brings results that are dead on target (right context) at first glance (not requiring to open the Web page for further investigation.)

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