Ceres is composed of and works with investors ($4 trillion) and environmental groups to address sustainability challenges. In their report Corporate Governance and Climate Change (2008 ) they argue that the banking sector needs to become aligned with GHG reductions.

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The report by the Canadian National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future: Advice for Long-Term reductions of Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants” claims that Canada as one of the wealthiest countries in the world is better positioned to bear the costs and risks of GHG and air pollutant emission reduction policies (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).” One of the five enabling conditions recommended by the NRTEE is an “economy-wide emission price signal.”

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In 2006 the Government of Canada asked the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) to examine issues of national long-term climate change and air pollution policies. Specifically, the NRTEE was to provide advice on how Canada could significantly reduce its GHG and air pollutant emissions by 2050.” The result is a NRTEE report entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future” which recommended five enabling conditions that should be reflected in Canada’s climate change policy framework: “Canada will have to work in concert with the world; Policy certainty – beyond the short term – is central; An economy-wide emission price signal, implemented with complementary measures, is the core element of a policy framework; Technology deployment will be imperative; An integrated approach to climate change and air pollution should be pursued. Substantial benefits can result from a policy framework in which climate change and clean air measures are designed and implemented concurrently, as many sources of GHGs also produce air pollutants.”

“Canada, as a northern nation with a long coastline and continent-sized landmass, will be among the most impacted countries in the world and Canada’s population will continue to grow during the period reviewed in our analysis, a fact not universal to the Western industrialized economies; and the fact that Canada will likely continue to be a net energy exporter during the period reviewed in our analysis. The latter two points imply that Canada’s emissions will continue to grow at levels that are likely higher than other industrialized nations, and so abatement effort will work from a higher base. However, a final national circumstance that Canada is fortunate to have should also be considered – that is the fact that we are one of the wealthiest countries in the world, and are therefore better positioned to bear the costs and risks of GHG and air pollutant emission reduction policies (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).”

NRTEE Members 2007-8: Glen Murray, Toronto, Ontario (Chair); David Kerr, Toronto, Ontario (Vice-Chair); Robert Page, TransAlta Professor of Environmental, Management & Sustainability, Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Vice-Chair); Janet L.R. Benjamin, North Vancouver, British Columbia; Pauline Browes Toronto, Ontario; Angus Bruneau, Chairman, Board of Directors, Fortis Inc., St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador; David Chernushenko, President, Green & Gold Inc., Ottawa, Ontario; Francine Dorion, Vice-President of Environment and Technology, Abitibi-Consolidated, Quebec; Richard Drouin, Counsel at McCarthy Tétrault, Montréal, Quebec; Timothy R. Haig, President and CEO, BIOX Corporation, Oakville, Ontario; Christopher Hilkene, President, Clean Water Foundation, Toronto, Ontario; Mark Jaccard, Professor, School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia; Stephen Kakfwi, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Ken McKinnon, Chair, Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board, Whitehorse, Yukon; Kerry Morash, Clarica Advisor, Liverpool, Nova Scotia; Richard Prokopanko, Director, Corporate Affairs for B.C., Alcan Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia; Wishart Robson, Climate Change Advisor, Nexen Inc., Calgary, Alberta; Robert Slater, Adjunct Professor, Environmental Policy, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario; David McLaughlin, NRTEE President & CEO.

Folksonomy: Canada:greenhouse gas mitigation, Canada:GHG, Canada:carbon dioxide mitigation, Canada:air pollution, Canada:environmental policy, global warming:prevention,

Terms

GHG greenhouse gases
Timeline

1988 “The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) was created by the federal government in October 1988.

1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. New York: United Nations, 1992 http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/conveng.pdf.

1993-05 The independent role and mandate of the The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) were enshrined in the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy Act, which was passed by the House of Commons in May 1993. Members are appointed by Governor in Council and includedistinguished leaders in business and labour, universities, environmental organizations, Aboriginal communities and municipalities (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).”

2006 In the fall the Government of Canada asked the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) to look at the issues of national long-term climate change and air pollution policies. Specifically, the NRTEE was asked to provide advice on how Canada could significantly reduce its GHG and air pollutant emissions by 2050.”

2007-04-26 The Government of Canada released its the Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution in which it set out a plan to regulate both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants from industrial emitters. The Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution will impose mandatory targets on industry to achieve a goal of an absolute reduction of 150 megatonnes in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020; impose targets on industry so that air pollution from industry is cut in half by 2015; regulate the fuel efficiency of cars and light duty trucks, beginning with the 2011 model year; strengthen energy efficiency standards for a number of energy-using products, including light bulbs. http://www.ecoaction.gc.ca/turning-virage/index-eng.cfm 

2007 Working Group III contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report entitled Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change” was prepared for The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report stated that global warming “is unlikely to be entirely natural in origin” and “the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence of the global climate.” 

2008-01 The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) made their report entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future” available to the public. The NRTEE recommended five enabling conditions that should be reflected in Canada’s climate change policy framework: “Canada will have to work in concert with the world; Policy certainty – beyond the short term – is central; An economy-wide emission price signal, implemented with complementary measures, is the core element of a policy framework; Technology deployment will be imperative; An integrated approach to climate change and air pollution should be pursued. Substantial benefits can result from a policy framework in which climate change and clean air measures are designed and implemented concurrently, as many sources of GHGs also produce air pollutants.”

Webliography and Bibliography

NRTEE (National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy). 2007. “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future: Advice for Long-Term reductions of Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants.” January. Ottawa, ON. http://www.nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/publications/getting-to-2050/Getting-to-2050-low-res-eng.pdf

In accepting the Nobel Prize Al Gore urgently called for the mobilization of civilization in defense of our common future faced with a planetary emergency – the imminent and universal threat of a climate crisis. Instead of offering false assurances that this can be done without effort, change or cost, responsible leaders must set aside short-term political goals and mobilize citizens with an uncomfortable message that to face this challenge, there will be sacrifices. Our leaders must acknowledge that they are accountable before history and they must speak with moral courage to inspire entire peoples, global citizens of every class and condition, entrepreneurs and innovators from every part of the globe to work couragously for our mutual survival. He rejects the belief that some hold that God will intercede on behalf of humanity to save the planet inspite of the actions or inaction of the the human species. Instead, Gore predicts that as humans unite around this moral purpose, we will collectively unleash a transformative spiritual energy.

Folksonomy

Nobel Peace Prize, moral compass, purpose, God, serve, civilization, planetary emergency, CO2

Webliography

Gore, Al. 2007. “A Precious and Painful Vision of the Future.” The Nation. December 10. Accessed December 10. http://www.thenation.com/doc/20071224/gore

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Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans researcher admits that migratory sea mammals, particularly ringed seals and beluga, continue to be poisoned by mercury at increasing levels from unknown sources. The benefits of Inuit food: caribou, whale (beluga) or ring seals, rich in vitamins, nutrition and low in oil are greater than the health risks.

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Dramatic images from NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado in Boulder reveal disturbing changes to the homelands of circumpolar Inuit. Rotten sea ice prevents access to resources. The amount of ice loss this year absolutely stunned CU-Boulder senior cryospheric scientist Mark Serreze of NSIDC.

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Sea ice extent continues to decline, and is now at 4.24 million square kilometers (1.63 million square miles), falling yet further below the previous record absolute minimum of 5.32 million square kilometers (2.05 million square miles) that occurred on Se

Key words, tags, folksonomies: environment, science, weather, Nunavut, circumpolar Inuit, Inuit social histories, climate change,

National Snow and Ice Data Center. 2007.

Armchair science: Montreal philosophy prof Laberge (2007) calls Al Gore, the high priest of the missionary ecological movement and claims Gore has turned the issue of climate change into a moral imperative. He uses 18th c. Scottish Enlightenment philosopher Hume’s is-ought problem to prove that the statement “global warming is bad” is erroneous.

In the socio-historical context in which Hume was writing he was concerned with distinguishing vulgar reasoning from true philosophy. He argued that there were four sciences: logic, morals, criticism, and politics. He claimed that morals do not result from logical reason and judgment but from tastes, sentiments, feelings and passions.

Hume distinguishes also between a vulgar [thinker who uses only common language] who proposes a system of morality and a true philosopher, between the thinking of a peasant and a true artisan. Vulgar reasoning shifts from ‘is’ to ‘ought’ imperceptibly without giving a proper explanation or producing evidence.

Is Laberge suggesting that Gore is a vulgar thinker who has not provided enough evidence for his case? In the case of climate change the science is overwhelmingly clear.

And humans do have the moral sensitivities which are the basis for making ethical decisions. We also have reason and scientific tools that provide us with experience-based evidence that informs our moral choices. Even Hume describes a political will, a social covenant in which citizens consult and agree upon a common ‘moral’ action.  We are not conscious of most of our mundane, everyday moral choices. Failing to protect forests or watersheds is a moral choice. A couple of decades ago most of us were insensitive to the moral nature of our actions that were destructive to ecosystems. In complex ecological issues where so many political, economics, geography, social and cultural interests converge, we consider ethical dimensions. Science can provide tools for measuring forest regeneration and efficient technologies for implementation. But science itself is not invested with moral sensitivity. It is only through human moral sensitivities that value judgments can be made in regards to unintended risks or side effects. Once science has provided evidence of shared, heightened risks we move from mere truth claims to moral justification for action or inaction.

Notes:

Keywords: Hume, philosophy, epistemology, ecology, is-ought, meta-ethics,
Webliography

Markie, Peter. 2004. “Rationalism vs. Empiricism.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Hume, David. 1739-40. “Footnote 13.”Treatise of Human Nature.

Laberge, Jean. 2007. “Le devoir de philo: le scepticisme de Hume contre les écolos.” Le Devoir. 19 mai.

 

The International Environment Forum shared ethical concerns of economic, social, and humanitarian burdens resulting from climate change. International law and norms, political and economic obligations are being rethought in anticipation of millions of climate change refugees. Panel members argued that moderate, civil religions (Etzioni 2007) can provide the motivation to ethical behaviour that is urgently needed.

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See also

Etzioni, Amitai. 2007a.”The West Needs a Spiritual Surge” >> Amitai Etzioni Notes. March 6, 2007.

Etzioni, Amitai. 2007b. L’Occident aussi a besoin d’un renouveau spirituel.” Le Monde. 7 avril.

Flynn-Burhoe, Maureen. 2007. “Does the West Need a Spiritual Surge?” >> Speechless. May 4.
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=ddp3qxmz_228hk8bnj