NRTEE calls GC to an economy-wide GHG emission price signal

January 12, 2008

The report by the Canadian National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future: Advice for Long-Term reductions of Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants” claims that Canada as one of the wealthiest countries in the world is better positioned to bear the costs and risks of GHG and air pollutant emission reduction policies (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).” One of the five enabling conditions recommended by the NRTEE is an “economy-wide emission price signal.”

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In 2006 the Government of Canada asked the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) to examine issues of national long-term climate change and air pollution policies. Specifically, the NRTEE was to provide advice on how Canada could significantly reduce its GHG and air pollutant emissions by 2050.” The result is a NRTEE report entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future” which recommended five enabling conditions that should be reflected in Canada’s climate change policy framework: “Canada will have to work in concert with the world; Policy certainty – beyond the short term – is central; An economy-wide emission price signal, implemented with complementary measures, is the core element of a policy framework; Technology deployment will be imperative; An integrated approach to climate change and air pollution should be pursued. Substantial benefits can result from a policy framework in which climate change and clean air measures are designed and implemented concurrently, as many sources of GHGs also produce air pollutants.”

“Canada, as a northern nation with a long coastline and continent-sized landmass, will be among the most impacted countries in the world and Canada’s population will continue to grow during the period reviewed in our analysis, a fact not universal to the Western industrialized economies; and the fact that Canada will likely continue to be a net energy exporter during the period reviewed in our analysis. The latter two points imply that Canada’s emissions will continue to grow at levels that are likely higher than other industrialized nations, and so abatement effort will work from a higher base. However, a final national circumstance that Canada is fortunate to have should also be considered – that is the fact that we are one of the wealthiest countries in the world, and are therefore better positioned to bear the costs and risks of GHG and air pollutant emission reduction policies (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).”

NRTEE Members 2007-8: Glen Murray, Toronto, Ontario (Chair); David Kerr, Toronto, Ontario (Vice-Chair); Robert Page, TransAlta Professor of Environmental, Management & Sustainability, Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Vice-Chair); Janet L.R. Benjamin, North Vancouver, British Columbia; Pauline Browes Toronto, Ontario; Angus Bruneau, Chairman, Board of Directors, Fortis Inc., St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador; David Chernushenko, President, Green & Gold Inc., Ottawa, Ontario; Francine Dorion, Vice-President of Environment and Technology, Abitibi-Consolidated, Quebec; Richard Drouin, Counsel at McCarthy Tétrault, Montréal, Quebec; Timothy R. Haig, President and CEO, BIOX Corporation, Oakville, Ontario; Christopher Hilkene, President, Clean Water Foundation, Toronto, Ontario; Mark Jaccard, Professor, School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia; Stephen Kakfwi, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Ken McKinnon, Chair, Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board, Whitehorse, Yukon; Kerry Morash, Clarica Advisor, Liverpool, Nova Scotia; Richard Prokopanko, Director, Corporate Affairs for B.C., Alcan Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia; Wishart Robson, Climate Change Advisor, Nexen Inc., Calgary, Alberta; Robert Slater, Adjunct Professor, Environmental Policy, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario; David McLaughlin, NRTEE President & CEO.

Folksonomy: Canada:greenhouse gas mitigation, Canada:GHG, Canada:carbon dioxide mitigation, Canada:air pollution, Canada:environmental policy, global warming:prevention,

Terms

GHG greenhouse gases
Timeline

1988 “The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) was created by the federal government in October 1988.

1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. New York: United Nations, 1992 http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/conveng.pdf.

1993-05 The independent role and mandate of the The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) were enshrined in the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy Act, which was passed by the House of Commons in May 1993. Members are appointed by Governor in Council and includedistinguished leaders in business and labour, universities, environmental organizations, Aboriginal communities and municipalities (NRTEE 2008:4-5 ).”

2006 In the fall the Government of Canada asked the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) to look at the issues of national long-term climate change and air pollution policies. Specifically, the NRTEE was asked to provide advice on how Canada could significantly reduce its GHG and air pollutant emissions by 2050.”

2007-04-26 The Government of Canada released its the Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution in which it set out a plan to regulate both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants from industrial emitters. The Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution will impose mandatory targets on industry to achieve a goal of an absolute reduction of 150 megatonnes in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020; impose targets on industry so that air pollution from industry is cut in half by 2015; regulate the fuel efficiency of cars and light duty trucks, beginning with the 2011 model year; strengthen energy efficiency standards for a number of energy-using products, including light bulbs. http://www.ecoaction.gc.ca/turning-virage/index-eng.cfm 

2007 Working Group III contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report entitled Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change” was prepared for The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report stated that global warming “is unlikely to be entirely natural in origin” and “the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence of the global climate.” 

2008-01 The National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) made their report entitled “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future” available to the public. The NRTEE recommended five enabling conditions that should be reflected in Canada’s climate change policy framework: “Canada will have to work in concert with the world; Policy certainty – beyond the short term – is central; An economy-wide emission price signal, implemented with complementary measures, is the core element of a policy framework; Technology deployment will be imperative; An integrated approach to climate change and air pollution should be pursued. Substantial benefits can result from a policy framework in which climate change and clean air measures are designed and implemented concurrently, as many sources of GHGs also produce air pollutants.”

Webliography and Bibliography

NRTEE (National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy). 2007. “Getting to 2050: Canada’s Transition to a Low-Emission Future: Advice for Long-Term reductions of Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants.” January. Ottawa, ON. http://www.nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/publications/getting-to-2050/Getting-to-2050-low-res-eng.pdf

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